Accurate and Informative Websites

We've asked Joyce C. to put together a list of websites that can be trusted.  Thanks to her for keeping us up-to-date on issues of relevance.


                       WEBSITES PROVEN TO BE ACCURATE & INFORMATIVE

                                                      March 2022

 

1.  wrea.net  - SPARTA’S state website

 

2.  spartanewsandnotes.com - Our chapter’s website

 

3.  wsaa.org - Wisconsin School Administrators Alliance (WREA’s partner lobbyist site assesses

daily legislation and how he/we respond) 

 

4.  thewheelerreport.com – covers Wisconsin Legislation including schedules

 

5.  wispolitics.com – covers current political activities

 

6.  wisconsinexaminer.com  - 501c3 nonprofit - covers current political updates and concerns

 

7.  captimes.com – current news from Madison

 

8.  prwatch.org – Center for Media and Democracy’s website addressing national political concerns

 

9.  presswatchers.org – addresses correctness of information

 

10.  heathercoxrichardson.substack.com – Daily newsletter about the history behind daily politics

 

11.  dianeravitch.net – Ravitch, former U.S. Assistant Director of Education, discusses current events and their relevance to education for all in her articles.

 

12.  robertreich.org – former U.S. Secretary of Labor discusses relevance of daily events in his articles.

 

13.  robertreich.substack.com – former Secretary of Labor explains current economic issues in his  daily letter. 

 

14.  dcreport.org – David Cay Johnston authors articles regarding current events and addresses his 40+ years of experience with the former president.

 

15.  wallstreetonparade.com – Excellent in depth information and citizen’s guide to wall street and its effect on current events.

 

16.  Sheldon Whitehouse “The Scheme” – Senator from Rhode Island has videotaped over 50 presentations in the U.S. Senate regarding the history of “dark money” and it’s connection to the U.S. Supreme Court and elected officials - referencing extensive research done by the Center for Media and Democracy.  Most presentations are about 20 to 30 minutes. Google the title to access the tapes.

No comments:

Post a Comment